advanced_placement_us_history__f68fb63e-9ef6-4def-8358-56f25954c9e6

AP® US History

AP® US History Score Calculator

AP® US History Score Calculator

If you’re wondering how you’d do on the APUSH exam, you’ve come to the right place. Try our AP® US History score calculator to calculate

The Ultimate List of AP® US History Tips

The Ultimate List of AP® US History Tips

Tackling the AP® US History exam is a tough undertaking. There is a ton of information to be learned, many skills to master, and not a lot of time to do it all. But you absolutely can do it! And we want to help you through these easy to use study tips!

The Ultimate AP® US History Guide to the 13 Colonies

The Ultimate AP® US History Guide to the 13 Colonies

Without the 13 colonies there would be no AP® United States History. Kind of obvious, right? But how much do you really know about these early European communities and the governments that they created? It can be a little daunting getting them all straight, especially since they each had their own identities, histories, places of origin, etc. But not to worry, we’ve created this APUSH review to get this info down for you just in time for the upcoming AP® US History exam.

Ensuring Your Students Earn the Contextualization Point on the DBQ

Ensuring Your Students Earn the Contextualization Point on the DBQ

The redesign has brought a great deal of uncertainty and confusion amongst APUSH teachers. In many ways, we are all “rookie” teachers, as all of us have the challenge of implementing fundamental curricular and skills-based changes into our classrooms.

One of the more significant changes is to the structure of one essay on the AP® exam, the Document Based question (DBQ). The rubric for the DBQ was previously a more holistic essay that combined a strong thesis, and use of documents and outside information to support the argument. This has been transformed into a much more structured and formulaic skills-based rubric. The change has led to a healthy debate about the pros and cons of both types of essays, but in general the core of the essay has remained the same: write a thesis and support it with evidence in the form of documents and outside information. If students continue to apply these basic writing skills, they are likely to earn 3 or 4 out of the seven total points for the Document Based Question.

How to Study for AP® US History

How to Study for AP® US History

The AP® US History exam can seem pretty overwhelming! There’s a lot of material to go through and master, and it can be hard to make a plan to study the APUSH exam. Fortunately, there’s help available, and you can make a smart, flexible, and successful study plan to review what you need to know, fill in any gaps in your knowledge, and be ready to succeed and get a good score on test day.

The Ultimate Guide to AP® US History Political Parties

The Ultimate Guide to AP® US History Political Parties

You are probably well aware that the current political party situation in the United States has been dominated by a two-party system a contest between the Republican and Democratic Parties. But did you know that these two parties didn’t really come to dominate the scene until 1856 (one of the two parties has claimed a win in every single presidential and congressional election since then)?

How to Earn the Synthesis Point on the DBQ and LEQ

How to Earn the Synthesis Point on the DBQ and LEQ

The redesign (and re-redesign in the second year) has brought a great deal of uncertainty and confusion amongst APUSH teachers. In many ways, we are all “rookie” teachers, as all of us have the challenge of implementing fundamental curricular and skills-based changes into our classrooms.

One of the more significant changes is to the structure of the major essays on the AP® exam, the Document Based question (DBQ) and Long Essay Question (LEQ). The rubrics for the essays were previously a more holistic essay that combined a strong thesis, and use of documents (for the DBQ only) and outside information. This has been transformed into a much more structured and formulaic skills-based rubric. The change has led to a healthy debate about the pros and cons of both types of essays, but in general the core of the essay has remained the same: write a thesis and support it with evidence in the form of documents (for the DBQ only) and outside information. If students do this basic writing, they are likely to earn 3-4 out of the possible points (six total points for the Long Essay Question, seven total points for the Document Based Question).

The Ultimate AP® US History New Deal Programs List

The Ultimate AP® US History New Deal Programs List

When Franklin D. Roosevelt took over from Herbert Hoover in 1933, the United States was going through a time of great crisis. The Great Depression, and later the Dust Bowl, had hit the nation hard, causing widespread unemployment, business and farm failures, and severe international trade problems. In order to combat the nation’s problems, FDR developed his New Deal “alphabet agencies.”